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Poster: deadhead53 Date: Oct 21, 2011 5:37am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

I am almost finished watching this (both parts combined are 3hrs and 35min) but this is fantastic. It is not just a Beatle thing, of course they are prominently in the doc but not the focus of it. It touches on so many subjects: early Beatles, his acid taking days, his non-acid taking days, his marriage, the break-up of the beatles, the break-up of his marrige, Eric Clapton, Ravi Shankar, his search for true peace through a religion, bangladesh, the all things must pass album. I highly recommend this doc if you have HBO or can get it. I believe Scorscesse directed it (although not completly sure about that) but it is really good and focuses in on him as a musician more so than a Beatle. Add to it I have always been a bigger fan of George than any other Beatle and it makes for a great watch! Enjoy

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Poster: Jobygoob Date: Oct 21, 2011 7:54am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

Agreed 100%, this film and the man's life was inspiring in so many ways. Highly recommended to watch.

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Poster: rdenirojb87 Date: Oct 21, 2011 8:40am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

i highly recommend this as well. scorsese did a wonderful job as he always does. one of the best pieces i've ever seen on the beatles. i loved the stuff with shankar.

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Poster: leftwinger57 Date: Oct 21, 2011 11:33am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

The thing w/ Scorcese is his unbelievable taste in music and how and where it fits within his movies and also the anthology of the blues that he did a few years back.He didn't direct Woodstock but was part of that film crew and as we should all know the Last Waltz was his. Just listen to the scores of Goodfellows and Casino and you will have absolutely no doubt about this guys' love for music.

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Poster: gratefuldiver Date: Oct 21, 2011 5:37pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

Don't forget the Scorcese documentary on Dylan's transition from folk star superhero to being heckled at his first concerts with The Band (?No Direction Home?). Fantastic 2-disc soundtrack too with all previously unreleased versions of his classics from the period.

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Poster: rdenirojb87 Date: Oct 21, 2011 11:48am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

The Last Waltz is perhaps the finest documentation i've ever seen of a concert film.

His musical picks in his films are always perfect, but I can't say I'm too familiar with the ones you mentioned.

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Poster: gratefuldiver Date: Oct 21, 2011 5:48pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

If you haven't seen The Last Waltz on a DVD with 'bonus material', there are some fascinating interviews with Scorcese about the difficulty filming the event. It makes a fantastic film even more impressive.

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Poster: DooDahDan Date: Oct 21, 2011 8:31pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

Sorry, I think the Last Waltz is a disaster. Danko's bass was out of tune, so they had to overdub all of his parts. You had the Neil "snow-cone" on his upper lip airbrushed out of the film, Levon does not smile once during the b/s interview segments because he had zero interest in breaking up the band and doing those lame interviews with Martin, there are virtually no shots of Manuel, and Robbie hams it up for the camera every chance he got (plus, he can't sing so they had to turn his mike off). And why the hell was Neil Diamond there? Folks, read Levon's book - it may not be the whole truth but it certainly puts the Last Waltz in what I think is the right perspective. Scorsee is not a good rockumentary film maker.

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Poster: vapors Date: Oct 21, 2011 8:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

I’ve been meaning to get me a copy of Levon’s book. Blemishes and disasters aside, the movie serves up some satisfaction for me. Mostly due to the fact that it showcases some of my favorite artists. Anyways, 3D, I am checking in to ask what you think of the new George film (if you have seen it) ?

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Poster: gratefuldiver Date: Oct 21, 2011 10:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

Tough customer! Danko's bass was out of tune!?! You are posting to a forum deadicated to a band where one the two primary lead singers was almost always out of tune and the back-up singer for 7+ years is generally hated for being out of tune. (Donna, I still love ya'!). If you knew anything about the concert, Neil Diamond was invited because he is Canadian...something that the entire group (excepting Levon) was *very* proud of. Speaking of which, Levon is a fantastic songwriter and singer and contributed enormously to The Band's success, but the guy from Arkansas among a bunch of Canadians should be expected to have a very different perspective. I guarantee if Pigpen wrote a memoir in early 1971 when he'd be completely lost as the rest of the group was completely high on LSD and 20 minutes into a Dark Star jam it would have the same 'outsider' feel that Levon felt. Finally regarding the famous nose-candy on Neil Young, if a similar 1-night-only concert of the Dead were filmed, if it were 1975 one might see track marks on Jerry's arms? In 1978, any member of the group doing a line as soon as they walked off stage for 'drumz'? On any Saturday night from the mid-60s until the early 70s, someone eating a tab of blotter acid on the way to the stage? Joe Cocker's performance is one of the highlights of Woodstock (granted, partially thanks to John Belushi), but anyone with a clue knows that he was high as a kite. Just because the blotter acid isn't on his tongue during the first verse doesn't make it less obvious than Neil Young's snow-cone nose. Was it wrong to airbrush it out? If it meant the MPRA wouldn't give the film an X rating, no! If Neil Young was so embarrassed (as he was) and pleaded with Marty to hide it for the sake of his career, no!

Scorcese captured an historic concert (granted with some self-indulgent interviews of some band members and hostility with others). It took Jerry how many years squirreled away in the studio to make a passable movie from 15+ hours of concert footage and half of it is cheesy animation and meaningless interviews with folks waiting in line (most of whom were far less articulate than the worst interviews in The Last Waltz)?

What do you consider to be a good 'rockumentary' (This Is Spinal Tap excluded)?

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Poster: DooDahDan Date: Oct 22, 2011 4:33pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

Gratefuldiver, your quote "If you knew anything about the concert, Neil Diamond was invited because he is Canadian...something that the entire group (excepting Levon) was *very* proud of." is way off. Yes, I do know something about the concert and being Canadian had nothing to do with it. Neil was friendly with Robbie, not with the rest of the Band, and The Last Waltz was Robbie's and Marty's baby. The rest of The Band went along with it because they did not generally push back on Robbie. Levon threatened litigation to stop it and the break up of The Band, but finally acquiesced because it would have been too costly a battle from a financial perspective. So don't be so condescending.

My point was simply I don't think it was a good movie from a musical perspective or otherwise. I have a ton of Band tapes, and they did far superior live work in the late '60s and early '70s before they all got strung out and Richard lost his way to the bottle. Most of the other acts went through the paces. The best part of the show is Muddy's performance, which generated a big smile from Levon at the end. I have seen several of Levon's "Midnight Rambles" at his barn in Woodstock, and he a far happier man now. And, that happiness comes through the music.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Oct 22, 2011 5:10pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

Because Robbie was producing him at the time; wasn't that the connection?

http://theband.hiof.no/albums/beautiful_noise.html

George Harrison?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=puSQjcAxbR0&;feature=related
Homage...


This post was modified by bluedevil on 2011-10-23 00:10:16

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Poster: leftwinger57 Date: Oct 22, 2011 5:09am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

neil Diamond was invited because he started out as a song writer at the Brill BLG in N.Y. were they met and became friends. Yes the newer version of the film is cleaned up Dylan has no white theater make up on and yeh Neil Young's coke rock is gone but to tear this movie apart like some of you have done is just nuts.When I listen to the cds I hear real pros at work and when you have that many people on and off stage shit is going to happen.Claptons strap popping off mid solo so Robbie takes over Van the man Dr.John these performances were great.As for Neil Diamond for me it was a head scrather but it fit as did most of it ,what I didn't get was the studio Emmylou Harris Waltz fantasy thing.

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Poster: Jacky Hughes Date: Oct 21, 2011 9:25am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

I read this biography recently, it was very good:

4129KFWFZYL._SS500_.jpg

George was always my favourite Beatle.

Such an influential and under-rated guitar player too.

This post was modified by Jacky Hughes on 2011-10-21 16:25:14

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Poster: rdenirojb87 Date: Oct 21, 2011 9:26am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

harrison was always so overshadowed by john and paul, but he was almost as talented imo.

i like john, then george, then paul. i forget the 4th guy.

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Poster: deadhead53 Date: Oct 21, 2011 10:02am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

Thanks for the recommendation Jacky! I am going to check it out and I guess my quest to finish the summer of 1973 tour this weekend is blown up now that I have a huge sudden urge to listen to All Things Must Pass all weekend!

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Poster: gratefuldiver Date: Oct 21, 2011 11:39pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

Compare 'All Things Must Pass' to the first solo albums by every other Beatle. It's obvious that George had lots of amazing material saved up that John/Paul just wouldn't let him record. 'It's Johnny's Birthday' is his venting at 'Birthday' appearing on the white album at the expense of so many great songs that George had already written.

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Oct 21, 2011 7:44am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - HBO's Documentary on George Harrison

I whole-heartedly agree. Fantastic look and a very under-appreciated talent.